Within recent days, our community has lost, through death, three outstanding citizens.

Evan Chambers, scion of a pioneer medical family in this community whose grandfather organized General Hospital (now Integris Bass Baptist), and whose father organized the Grand National Quail Hunt and served on the Oklahoma Wildlife Commission, was an outspoken and tenacious lawyer. Her was the closest thing that Enid had, both in appearance and style, of the famous criminal lawyer Gerry Spence. Anyone charged with a crime who retained Evans Chambers could be assured of his devotion that nothing was taken from the client, neither his life, nor liberty, except by due process of law.

Ed Houck came here from North Dakota more than 30 years ago to become publisher of the Enid Morning News and Daily Eagle. He, along with his editor Jerry Pitman, steered the newspaper through turbulent times as the Internet and social media were coming into their own. I remember their courtesy and consideration of me, as well as their objectivity and fairness, when I was appointed by the federal courts to represent “the most hated man in America,” Tim McVeigh, who had been charged and ultimately convicted of the use of a weapon of mass destruction to destroy the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building at what was, at that time, the largest mass murder in American history. Without these qualities which I have described, I doubt that I could have discharged my duty as I thought appropriate. Rather than returning to North Dakota, he and Barbara remained here until their final days.

Patrick Farrell was for many years the only pharmacist in Enid with a doctoral degree in pharmacy. He came here through his experience at Vance Air Force Base and became a registered pharmacist working for decades with Walter Scheffe. Patrick had that wonderful personality quality of lifting the spirits of everyone he came in contact with when he entered the room. His infectious smile, good nature and general humor made him an outstanding personality. A dedicated professional, he was always willing to take a moment to explain the intricacies of a prescription or some other malady affecting those in need. After his wife passed away a number of years ago, Mary Gray became his companion for the rest of his life. Together, the sparkle of their personalities never dimmed.

This community has truly lost three men of different personalities, professions and lives, but all contributed to the humanity and the life we enjoy in Enid.

Stephen Jones is an attorney in Enid.

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