A bill working its way through the Legislature would allow schools to teach students skills for how to survive once they are on their own.

House Bill 2727, authored by state Rep. Ajay Pittman, D-Oklahoma City, would create an “Adulting 101” elective available as early as the 2022-23 school year that would teach students such things as financial literacy and budgeting, managing stress, grocery shopping, how to check oil levels in vehicles, and how to understand what the numbers on street signs mean. Students also would learn how to mail something, how to send a professional email, how to fill out apartment applications, how to write a cover letter and how to prepare a resume for a job.

Pittman said her bill, which currently is in the Senate, relies on a partnership with the state’s CareerTech program, which will use its family and consumer science curriculum. She said CareerTech is willing to partner with schools to come in and offer an elective class at no additional cost to districts.

Though the program would be available to any student in seventh to 12th grade, Pittman said the program will be geared toward high school students.

We like this idea. The one negative we would say about the proposed class is that this is something parents should be teaching their children. However, that shouldn’t be a reason to defeat the bill in the Legislature.

Let’s face it, schools no longer are able to just teach reading, writing and arithmetic. They haven’t been doing that for some time.

A class like “Adulting 101” would teach young people valuable skills they will need, whether they are going to college or joining the workforce right out of high school. The financial literacy aspect is particularly needed. Young people, and frankly, many older adults as well, need to know how to budget their money so they have enough to cover their expenses.

It looks like a good thing that the Legislature should pass and schools should adopt.

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