Jace Lee McKitterick and Jerry James Kendall Ritchie

Jace Lee McKitterick and Jerry James Kendall Ritchie

OKLAHOMA CITY — Alleged members of the Universal Aryan Brotherhood, including two from Enid, have been charged with crimes including possessing methamphetamine with intent to distribute and/or possessing a firearm after a felony conviction, according to Robert J. Troester of the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

The charges against Jace Lee McKitterick, 29, and Jerry James Kendall Ritchie, 32, both of Enid; Ross Tyson Pilkington, 39, of Lawton; and Michael Quinton Smith II, 48, of Oklahoma City, were announced following indictments returned by a federal grand jury that charge each separately based on different events and times, according to a U.S. Departement of Justice press release.

McKittrick

Garfield County Sheriff’s Office attempted to stop a red GMC, later determined to be driven by McKittrick, for a traffic violation at about 12:30 a.m. Oct. 10, 2018, according to an affidavit in support of a criminal complaint filed Nov 1.

McKittrick failed to stop and instead drove through a residential area at alleged speeds of up to 70 mph before turning around and ramming a pursuing police car, according to the affidavit. He then allegedly ran his vehicle into a tree and fled on foot. A pursuing officer was able to arrest him through the use of a taser, according to the complaint. Numerous one-gram-style baggies containing 26.1 grams of a white crystalline substance that tested positive for methamphetamine, a marijuana cigar, and other items, were found in the vehicle McKittrick was driving.

In addition to a possession of methamphetamine with intent to distribute from that incident, the indictment charges McKittrick with three crimes on Sept. 23, 2018: possession of methamphetamine and Oxycodone with intent to distribute, being a felon in possession of a firearm and possessing a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking.

If convicted, McKittrick could be imprisoned for 20 years and face not less than three years of supervised release for possessing methamphetamine or Oxycodone with intent to distribute; 10 years, plus three years of supervised release, for being a felon in possession of a firearm; and five years in addition to any other penalty, plus up to five years of supervised release, for possessing a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking.

Pilkington

A detective with Lawton Police Department stopped Pilkington for an alleged traffic violation June 12, 2018, according to an affidavit in support of a criminal complaint filed Oct. 31.

The affidavit reports allegations the detective felt a crunchy substance in Pilkington’s pocket while conducting a pat-down for weapons and discovered what appeared to be methamphetamine in a clear plastic bag. Further search of the vehicle yielded allegedly 331 grams of methamphetamine, digital scales and clear plastic baggies.

If convicted, Pilkington faces imprisonment between five and 40 years and not less than four years of supervised release for possessing methamphetamine with intent to distribute. Court records show that at the time of arrest Pilkington was on supervised release following a conviction for being a felon in possession of a firearm.

Ritchie

Enid Police Department officers stopped a Buick SUV driven by Ritchie on Oct. 19, 2018, for a traffic violation, according to an affidavit in support of a criminal complaint filed Nov. 1. Ritchie fled on foot, and when officers apprehended him he refused to place his hands in the air and was pulled to the ground and handcuffed while yelling and cursing, according to the affidavit. Officers ultimately discovered a loaded semi-automatic pistol in the SUV, along with bags with a white substance that tested positive for methamphetamine and two digital scales.

An indictment now charges Ritchie with possession of 3.9 grams of methamphetamine with intent to distribute, illegal possession of a firearm after a felony conviction and possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking.

If convicted, Ritchie faces up to 20 years in prison, a fine of up to $1,000,000 and three years of supervised release on the drug count; 10 years prison and up to three years of supervised release on the charge of being felon in possession of a firearm; and a mandatory term of five years of imprisonment beyond any other sentence and three years of supervised release on possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking. If the court were to determine he qualifies as an armed career criminal, he would be subject to a mandatory prison term of 115 years and a maximum sentence of life, according to the DOJ release.

Smith

Oklahoma City Police Department officers found Smith asleep just after 3 a.m. Aug. 7, 2018, in a Toyota Tundra that was straddling lanes at the intersection of S.W. 59th and Blackwelder, according to an affidavit in support of a criminal complaint filed Nov. 9.

After waking Smith up, an officer determined he had been driving under revocation, had five felony warrants out of Oklahoma County and was a convicted felon, according to the affidavit. The officer reported seeing a firearm, later identified as a Bushmaster Firearms International, Model XM15-E2S, .223 caliber/5.56 rifle, in plain view on the back floorboard. The gun had a loaded 30-round magazine and had been stolen in Midwest City, according to the affidavit.

If convicted of being a felon in possession of a firearm, Smith could be imprisoned for 10 years and face up to three years of supervised release.

Charges against McKittrick and Ritchie are the results of investigations by Enid Police Department, Garfield County Sheriff’s Office, U.S. Department of Homeland Security — Homeland Security Investigations and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, with assistance from the District Attorney’s Office for Garfield County.

The charge against Pilkington is the result of an investigation by Lawton Police Department and the FBI, with assistance from the District Attorney’s Office for Comanche County.

The charge against Smith is the result of an investigation by the Oklahoma City Police Department and U.S. Department of Homeland Security — Homeland Security Investigations, with assistance from the District Attorney’s Office for Oklahoma County.

Prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Nicholas Patterson and Mark R. Stoneman, these four cases are part of Project Safe Neighborhoods, a Department of Justice program to reduce violent crime. In October 2017, the department announced the reinvigoration of Project Safe Neighborhoods and directed U.S. attorney offices to develop crime-reduction strategies that incorporate lessons federal law enforcement has learned since the program’s launch in 2001.

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