Well, it’s been another week of either drought or floods, depending on where you’re at.

The area around Enid is already 5 or 6 inches above normal for the year, and there’s certainly more rain in the forecast. Although the moisture is something everyone needs, it would be helpful if it came at a more opportune time. Wheat harvest has definitely slowed down, but has sure not stopped.

It’s hard to tell how much wheat has been cut, but if you drive down one road there will be many fields done and some even worked, while driving down another road it might look like no one has been doing any work. Whatever road you go down, the elevators still are busy, and it sounds like most everyone is having a fairly good harvest.

The cattle market is hard to figure out, if a person hasn’t figured that out yet. The cash market for cattle seems to be sluggish, if not lower, yet the futures board is screaming out of sight. Next April live cattle futures were at $117.70 on Tuesday, which is unbelievable. How high, or low, will the governing bodies let the funds drive the market? And how is it possible that they can, when they don’t even own any of the commodities?

These are exciting, if not strange times in the cattle business. For the most part, the live cattle futures are the same or higher than the feeder cattle and for whatever reason, the higher the grains go, the higher the cattle go. Is it cheap grains make for cheap cattle or high grains make for high cattle? It will be interesting to see where we actually are next spring in the cattle market.

For the moment, we have calves and yearlings at a lower price, per se, than the fat cattle, with grains at all time highs. Most folks would think that if the cost of gain went higher, then the cost of the feeders would get cheaper, yet that hasn’t happened yet. It might be a good time to take advantage of the moisture we’ve gotten here in Oklahoma. When the summer is gone, and winter rolls around, if Oklahoma still has some moisture, it might be the only place to put on a pound of gain without using a truck or bucket. And it certainly won’t cost $1.50 a pound to do it.

We wish everyone great luck in harvest.



Winter is owner/sales manager of Winter Livestock, which has an auction every Tuesday.

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