The Enid News and Eagle, Enid, OK

Summer of '68

July 13, 2008

Enid surgeon spent summer of ’68 treating wounded soldiers

(Continued)



Following the surgery residency, Selby joined the Air Force as a medical officer, where he was commissioned a captain and served two years, from 1966-68, on active duty, mostly at Clark AFB Hospital on the Philippines, Selby said.

“It was great. The experience in the Air Force added to my skills as a surgeon. We were responsible for the surgical care of the wounded veterans we admitted. It wasn’t just Air Force personnel. Mainly it was U.S. Army and Marines,” Selby said.

There were 64 surgeons at the Clark AFB Hospital, Selby recalled. They even treated military personnel from South Korea, he said.

Today Selby downplays the unusualness of the extraction surgery he performed on Palmer while simultaneously acknowledging the surgery saved the young soldier’s life.

“We had certain criteria we checked on the patients who stopped here, and if they met those criteria, we pulled them off the plane, triaged them, which included mandatory chest x-rays, and treated them at our hospital before sending them on. In Palmer’s case, a chest x-ray revealed the bullet fragment in his lung,” Selby said.

Selby said his work as a surgeon has required he visit Washington, D.C., on several occasions.

“I always visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. It’s easier to look back on now,” Selby said.

Sally and Ronald Palmer have been married 34 years, have children together and several grandchildren, too.ex-rays, and treated them at our hospital before sending them on. In Palmer’s case, a chest x-ray revealed the bullet fragment in his lung,” Selby said.

Selby said his work as a surgeon has required he visit Washington, D.C., on several occasions.

“I always visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. It’s easier to look back on now,” Selby said.

Sally and Ronald Palmer have been married 34 years, have children together and several grandchildren, too.

Text Only
Summer of '68