The Enid News and Eagle, Enid, OK

Opinion

October 11, 2012

If you don’t vote, you shouldn’t complain very much about the election

ENID, Okla. — We were surprised and disappointed in Robert Barron’s report that fewer voters are registered in Garfield County than in 2008.

Although independent registration is up 195 in Garfield County, the number of registered Democrats in the county fell by 1,508 from 2008 and the number of registered Republicans fell by 36.

Sen. Patrick Anderson, R-Enid, said both parties take positions that alienate many people, and so voters choose to be independent, rather than associate themselves with either party.

We encourage independent registration, although our oppressive primary laws make it difficult to participate.

When you consider the amount of discourse generated by the 2012 presidential election, our overall voter registration decrease is especially ironic.

Practically everyone has an opinion on the crucial race for commander in chief, and even the undecided voters are paying attention.

Perhaps voters are fatigued by the venomous, partisan rhetoric that is poisoning the airwaves and Internet.

Or, as University of Oklahoma political science professor Keith Gaddie claims, the change among traditional parties could be as simple as a purge in voter records.

We all know that Oklahoma is a red state.

All 77 counties voted for John McCain during the last presidential election, but there are other important items on the ballot in November.

While Oklahoma’s presidential outcome may be a forgone conclusion, voting is part of our civic duty.

And we need to make an informed choice.

Part of our responsibility for inheriting freedom is to be part of the process that governs us.

Our republic will fall apart if apathy runs rampant.

Put your money where your mouth is.

If you don’t vote, you don’t have a right to complain.

Since today is the deadline to register for the presidential election, we urge you to do so before it’s too late.

The Garfield County Election Board will be open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. today.

Register to vote or keep quiet.

1
Text Only
Opinion
Featured Ads
House Ads