The Enid News and Eagle, Enid, OK

Community News Network

January 15, 2013

OKCupid releases app for 'Crazy Blind Dates'

(Continued)

OKCupid was acquired in 2011 by New York-based IAC/InterActiveCorp, media mogul Barry Diller's holding company. Last October, Yagan took over its portfolio of dating sites, which had $518 million in revenue in 2011, up 29 percent from the prior year. The company's other sites include Match.com, for people looking for serious relationships, and OurTime, for daters over age 50. Most of the sites either ask for a monthly subscription fee, like Match, or charge users to send messages. OKCupid, aimed at users ages 18 to 34, makes money mainly through advertising.

OKCupid attempted a Web-based version of Crazy Blind Date in 2007, but not enough users had smartphones at the time, the company said. Now the industry is shifting to mobile, with more people using apps than websites for dating in 2011 for the first time, according to an IBISWorld report. The OKCupid mobile app and website receive 20 times as much activity as in January 2012, according to the company.

Yagan has tracked all kinds of data on users to determine what they want from OKCupid — his company's blog, OKTrends, displays line graphs detailing things like a country's per capita GDP versus the percentage of people who are looking for casual sex on the site. Ultimately, he said, users are just looking for fun and convenience. But the average visit to the site lasts 20 minutes, since users must sift through messages or work on developing enough of a rapport with someone to attempt a first date.

Using the Crazy Blind Date app, the time spent on a smartphone can be less than two minutes. Your co-worker says you look good today? Go on a date tonight, and the app will pull options based on OKCupid's algorithm. Less forethought could be a good thing, said Sarah Wexler, author of "Awful First Dates: Hysterical, True, and Heartbreakingly Bad."

Text Only
Community News Network
  • Dangerous Darkies Logo.png Redskins not the only nickname to cause a stir

    Daniel Snyder has come under fire for refusing to change the mascot of his NFL team, the Washington Redskins. The Redskins, however, are far from being the only controversial mascot in sports history.  Here is a sampling of athletic teams from all areas of the sports world that were outside the norm.

    July 28, 2014 3 Photos

  • 'Rebel' mascot rising from the dead

    Students and alumni from a Richmond, Va.-area high school are seeking to revive the school's historic mascot, a Confederate soldier known as the "Rebel Man," spurring debate about the appropriateness of public school connections to the Civil War and its icons.

    July 28, 2014

  • Fast food comes to standstill in China

    The shortage of meat is the result of China's latest food scandal, in which a Shanghai supplier allegedly tackled the problem of expired meat by putting it in new packaging and shipping it to fast-food restaurants around the country

    July 28, 2014

  • wd saturday tobias .jpg Stranger’s generosity stuns Ohio veteran

    Vietnam War veteran David A. Tobias was overwhelmed recently when a fellow customer at an OfficeMax store near Ashtabula, Ohio paid for a computer he was purchasing.

    July 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • Screen Shot 2014-07-28 at 1.33.11 PM.png VIDEO: High-dive accident caught on tape

    A woman at a water park in Idaho leaped off a 22-foot high dive platform, then tried to pull herself back up with frightening results. Fortunately, she escaped with only a cut to her finger.

    July 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • CATS-DOGS281.jpg Where cats are more popular than dogs in the U.S.-and all over the world

    We all know there are only two types of people in the world: cat people and dog people. But data from market research firm Euromonitor suggest that these differences extend beyond individual preferences and to the realm of geopolitics: it turns out there are cat countries and dog countries, too.

    July 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • How spy agencies keep their 'toys' from law enforcement

    A little over a decade ago, federal prosecutors used keystroke logging software to steal the encryption password of an alleged New Jersey mobster, Nicodemo Scarfo Jr., so they could get evidence from his computer to be used at his trial.

    July 25, 2014

  • Russia's war on McDonald's takes aim at the Filet-o-Fish

    Russia said earlier this week that it had no intention of answering Western sanctions by making it harder for Western companies to conduct business in Russia.
    But all bets are off, apparently, when you threaten the Russian waistline.

    July 25, 2014

  • Arizona's prolonged lethal injection is fourth in U.S. this year

    Arizona's execution of double-murderer Joseph Wood marked the fourth time this year that a state failed to dispatch a convict efficiently, according to the Constitution Project, a bipartisan legal group.3

    July 24, 2014

  • Police Brutality screen shot. Technology plays key part in battling police brutality (VIDEO)

    Allegations of police brutality are nothing new -- as long as there has been law enforcement, citizens have registered claims that some officers cross the line. But in the last few years, the claims of excessive force are being corroborated with new technology from cell phone cameras, police dash-cams and surveillance videos. 

    July 24, 2014 1 Photo