The Enid News and Eagle, Enid, OK

Ag

June 7, 2014

Take steps to control flies on beef cattle

ENID, Okla. — Biting flies are carriers of such diseases as anaplasmosis and bovine leukosis virus. Face flies can spread Moraxella bovis, which causes pinkeye, from animal to animal.

The economic loss from each horn fly biting an animal 30 times/day also can be substantial.

But flies have adapted to the environment for many, many years; realistically, there is zero chance that we’ll completely win the battle. Here is an outline for a multi-pronged approach for beef cattle producers to lessen flies’ impact.

• Feed a larvicide or an insect growth regulator like Altosid (labeled for horn flies) or Rabon (labeled for horn, face, house- and stable flies) to cows, starting 30 days before flies typically emerge. Continue feeding until 30 days after a killing frost.

ClariFly also is an option, but is mainly used for confinement cattle. If an adjacent property also has cattle, the owners of those cattle also need to feed the product to their cattle or you might inherit some of the neighbor’s flies. Horn flies don’t travel long distances, but face flies may travel 1-2 miles.

• Fly tags. Newer-generation fly tags that contain a higher concentration of insecticide are quite helpful in quite helpful in controlling fly populations. Use pyrethroid tags for two consecutive years, and then switch to an organophosphate tag for one year to reduce pyrethroid resistance. Follow label directions on the number of tags/cow.

Many tags require two tags/adult animal, and one tag/calf for optimum control. The key to using tags is to wait until you have 200 flies/cow to place the tags. If one applies the tags too early, there will be decreased efficacy. Plan to remove the tags in 3-5 months, in order to prevent the release of minute amounts of insecticide that can lead to resistance issues.

• Pour-ons. Use a pour-on at the same time you fly-tag the cows. If it’s spring turnout time, you can use a product that also kills internal parasites, as these products also have efficacy against horn flies. Later in the year, use products only labeled for flies and/or lice. Using pour-on dewormers many times throughout the year could lead to internal parasite resistance issues.

• Dust bags/cattle rubs. The advantage of a dust bag or rub is that, if placed at a site where all cattle must use it, it can provide very economical control of face and horn flies. Proper placement and keeping it charged with insecticide are the keys.

• Sprays. Timely spraying of cattle throughout the year can be effective in reducing the fly population, but can be time-consuming if cattle are grazing an extensive area.

There are many products on the market for fly control. Sitting down with your extension educator and/or extension beef specialist and/or veterinarian to develop a plan to control flies is the best plan for success. Using just one strategy from the above list likely won’t give you the results you anticipate. A multifaceted approach is best for attaining your goal of controlling flies.

Reference to commercial products or trade names is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service is implied.

Nelson is Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service ag educator for Garfield County.

1
Text Only
Ag
  • Trent Milacek web.jpg Despite poor harvest, wheat price falls

    I grew up and currently reside on our family farm southwest of Waukomis.

    July 26, 2014 1 Photo

  • Master Gardener logocmyk.jpg Gardeners share their favorites

    Annuals only last one season, but they are important because of the great variety of flowers that keep the garden colorful throughout the summer.

    July 26, 2014 1 Photo

  • Conservation workshop set

    The workshop will be 6 p.m. at the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Center, 316 E. Oxford.

    July 26, 2014

  • Jeff Bedwell Consider safety of forage beforehand

    Drought conditions of the past three to four years and in particular the past eight months had hay/forage inventories at critically low levels. The most recent period ranked as the third-driest period in recorded history. Not unlike the farmers and ranchers of other times of drought, ag producers now have been very resourceful to not only replace hay supplies that have dwindled but also add much-needed revenue to farm income.

    July 19, 2014 1 Photo

  • Right to Farm web 1.jpg Ag industry seeks right to farm

    The emerging battle could have lasting repercussions for the nation’s food supply and for the millions of people worldwide who depend on U.S. agricultural exports. It’s also possible the right-to-farm idea could sputter as a merely symbolic gesture that carries little practical effect beyond driving up voter turnout in local elections.

    July 19, 2014 2 Photos

  • farm - Burlington FFA web.jpg Burlington students attend camp

    More than 1,600 FFA members from 289 Oklahoma FFA chapters attended one of four three and one-half day sessions from June 29-July 12.

    July 19, 2014 1 Photo

  • farm - Oklahoma's Dirty Dozen poster 150dpi_W.jpg Poster targets invasive plants

    They all have more than four letters, but they are certainly bad words in the state of Oklahoma.

    July 12, 2014 1 Photo

  • farm - Rick Nelson web.jpg Simple steps can prevent fungus infection

    July 12, 2014 1 Photo

  • Help plants survive the summer heat

    The July hot weather has arrived, and Oklahoma State University has some suggestions for helping with our gardening needs this month.

    July 12, 2014

  • farm - 4-H_W_W.jpg State 4-H honors volunteers

    A group of dedicated parents and volunteers with Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Program gathered recently in Stillwater for learning, sharing of ideas and recognition of dedication to Oklahoma’s youth.

    July 12, 2014 1 Photo

Featured Ads
Facebook