The Enid News and Eagle, Enid, OK

Ag

June 29, 2013

Expert: Don’t change feeding program

ENID, Okla. — Recent rainfall has led some producers to wonder whether or not they need to alter their Oklahoma Gold and SuperGold cattle feeding programs.

“The short answer is no: cattle producers in Oklahoma and many areas of the region should be right on schedule for getting the most out of both programs,” said Chris Richards, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Ex-tension beef cattle nutrition specialist.

Lightweight calves that weigh about 400 pounds or less, or cattle with limited forage, should use the Super-Gold program now. Animals weighing 600 pounds or more with adequate available forage should be on the Okla-homa Gold program in late June and no later than July 1.

While improved forage conditions caused by recent rainfall are most definitely a benefit to producers, it can lead to some head-scratching when it comes to determining appropriate stocking rates and forage quality.

Economically, grazed forage is an inexpensive feed source for cattle and the producer needs a balanced management approach to maximize use of available forage yet allow for pasture recovery, with an emphasis on promoting sustainable operational efficiency.

“With rapid growth from recent rains combined with stocking at recommended reduced rates to allow for drought recovery, forage in the pasture will accumulate as summer progresses,” Richards said. “It’s important to remember that while abundant forage may be available, the protein and digestibility of available forage will decrease significantly as the plants mature.”

Developed by scientists with OSU’s Division of Agricultural Scien-ces and Natural Resources, the Ok-lahoma Gold and SuperGold programs make cattle eat more forage and use it for positive body condition, growth and health functions. Further-more, the programs represent a well-planned protein plan to offset deficiencies caused by decreases in forage quality.

The Oklahoma Gold program uses a low-quantity, high-protein supplement with an ionophore to promote efficient gains on summer grass.

In several OSU research trials conducted with mid-summer harvested prairie hay, forage intake has been increased by 20 percent to 30 percent while digestibility improved by 15 percent to 20 percent when cattle were fed one pound of a 38 percent to 41 percent protein supplement.

“Assuming an increase in gain of 0.6 pounds per day from the Oklahoma Gold programs, and an average value of gain of 80 cents, the total increase in revenue would be 48 cents per day,” Richards said.

Recent research conducted by scientists with OSU’s department of animal science demonstrated that use of byproducts such as dried distillers grains can provide the protein in the supplement programs that were originally developed with protein meals from cotton seed and soybeans.

“The ionophore is an essential component of the program as it increases cattle’s ability to process forage, adding about 0.2 pounds per day in additional gain above protein supplement alone when animals graze dry, summer native range,” Richards said.

With a cost of 18 cents for the one pound of supplement at recommended rates, the added income from the Oklahoma Gold program would be 30 cents per head per day.

“When grazing adequate quantities of forage, the Oklahoma Gold program generates an excellent return on investment,” Richards said. “A sound health program, external and internal parasite control and a growth promoting implant program will further enhance animal performance and efficiency of forage utilization.”

The SuperGold program puts 1.5 pounds of wheat midds on top of a pound of Gold feed, resulting in 2.5 pounds of supplement that is 25 percent protein.

“While Oklahoma Gold can’t be beat for efficiency, SuperGold targets cattle that need the extra feed energy or have more limited forage resources,” Richards said.

Cattle and calves represent the No. 1 agricultural commodity produced in Oklahoma.

1
Text Only
Ag
  • Jeff Bedwell Consider safety of forage beforehand

    Drought conditions of the past three to four years and in particular the past eight months had hay/forage inventories at critically low levels. The most recent period ranked as the third-driest period in recorded history. Not unlike the farmers and ranchers of other times of drought, ag producers now have been very resourceful to not only replace hay supplies that have dwindled but also add much-needed revenue to farm income.

    July 19, 2014 1 Photo

  • Right to Farm web 1.jpg Ag industry seeks right to farm

    The emerging battle could have lasting repercussions for the nation’s food supply and for the millions of people worldwide who depend on U.S. agricultural exports. It’s also possible the right-to-farm idea could sputter as a merely symbolic gesture that carries little practical effect beyond driving up voter turnout in local elections.

    July 19, 2014 2 Photos

  • farm - Burlington FFA web.jpg Burlington students attend camp

    More than 1,600 FFA members from 289 Oklahoma FFA chapters attended one of four three and one-half day sessions from June 29-July 12.

    July 19, 2014 1 Photo

  • farm - Oklahoma's Dirty Dozen poster 150dpi_W.jpg Poster targets invasive plants

    They all have more than four letters, but they are certainly bad words in the state of Oklahoma.

    July 12, 2014 1 Photo

  • farm - Rick Nelson web.jpg Simple steps can prevent fungus infection

    July 12, 2014 1 Photo

  • Help plants survive the summer heat

    The July hot weather has arrived, and Oklahoma State University has some suggestions for helping with our gardening needs this month.

    July 12, 2014

  • farm - 4-H_W_W.jpg State 4-H honors volunteers

    A group of dedicated parents and volunteers with Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Program gathered recently in Stillwater for learning, sharing of ideas and recognition of dedication to Oklahoma’s youth.

    July 12, 2014 1 Photo

  • Danna Zook cutout web.jpg Water quality important for livestock

    Even though many areas have been blessed with ample rain this past month, we must not brush aside issues resulting from the evident drought.

    June 28, 2014 1 Photo

  • Farm Poisoni_Hass web.jpg Poison tested to control hogs: Preservative used to cure bacon may be key to problem

    Hunting and trapping won’t do the trick for these big, wildly prolific animals. So, the U.S. Department of Agriculture kicked off a $20 million program this year to control feral swine, which have spread from 17 states in 1982 to 39 now.

    June 28, 2014 2 Photos

  • farm  - Junior Beef Ambassadors web.jpg Area youth place in beef ambassador contest

    Cash prizes were given to the top three contestants in each age division.

    June 28, 2014 2 Photos

Featured Ads
Facebook